Our Team

Our Team

Laura Byrtus

Registered Psychologist

“I was always looking outside myself for strength and confidence, but it comes from within. It is there all the time.”
— Anna Freud

People often come to therapy at a time when they are stuck in a pattern, with depression, anxiety, or relationship issues. With therapy, you can learn the root of your problems, including when and why those patterns started. I see therapy as a means of answering the question, “Why?” “Why do I make the choices I do?” “Why does this seem to keep happening?” Once you have an understanding as to “why,” then you can start making long-lasting changes to improve your life.

About

I have a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) (Co-op) in Psychology from University of Alberta and a Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology from McGill University. I am registered with the College of Alberta Psychologists and a member of the Psychologists Association of Alberta. Over the past 9 years, I have worked a variety of settings, including community, hospital, and private practice. I enjoy working with individuals, couples, and groups to better function in their daily lives. 

I work mostly from a psychodynamic perspective, as it promotes insight and looking deeply into one’s past, to understand how past events impact current functioning. However, I also draw on client-centered, narrative, solution-focused, emotion-focused, and other treatment modalities to help clients reach their goals. It is important to me to be flexible in my approach, as each person experiences change in a unique way.

My goal as a Psychologist is to guide you to become your own therapist; using what you learn about yourself and relationship dynamics, you can continue to grow and improve after your last session.

My areas of  Specialty

For more information, or to schedule a session:

Call (780) 460-0022
info@riversedgecounselling.com

Send a text message.

More About My specialties

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Trauma
Often when people experience trauma, they proceed through life with a greater level of fear than others might. This fear can lead to many difficulties, including explosive anger, anxiety, addictions, and difficulty trusting others...read more
I have worked extensively with histories of trauma, including physical abuse, psychological abuse, sexual abuse (i.e., childhood sexual abuse, incest, and/or rape), war, and criminal activity. I have found that clients who are willing to explore these histories are able to gain a better understanding of their past’s impact on present functioning. My goal in working with trauma is to get to a point in which the client can “let go” of the past and move forward with a healthier, more fulfilling life. .

Pre-Marriage Counselling
As Kristen Bell said regarding marriage counselling with husband Dax Shepard, “You do better in the gym with a trainer; you don’t figure out how to cook without reading a recipe.” Couples often think of therapy as a last-ditch effort before separation or divorce...read more
One could view this logic as similar to someone with lung cancer who has decided to stop smoking and hope that it solves their problems. At that point, the damage is done, and difficult to recover from. Pre-marriage counselling can be viewed as a preventative measure. Marriage is a complicated endeavor; two people with different experiences coming together to share a life has its challenges. Learning how to communicate effectively, recognize trigger points, and keep the relationship’s health as a priority can lead to a long, fulfilling life together.

Couples
In couple’s counselling, the real client is the relationship. It is not about determining who is right and wrong, but to look at what is really going on in that relationship. Each person has a part to play, both in the successes and struggles that are shared...read more
I have worked with couples to recognize and communicate with their partners their wants and needs. Also, learning how to express how one feels in a respectful, healthy manner can help keep arguments from turning into screaming matches. Making changes to maladaptive behaviours and thought processes results in healthier interactions, and therefore a healthier relationship.